** yawn ** Buys’ media whore inc.

My favourites –
‘…and “hacker” or “leet” talk – a code language commonly used by hackers. ..’
‘…The fact that an extremist Pakistani group is active in South Africa is truly worrying,” said Buys…’

Yeah, Reinhardt, I’m shitting my pants.

Here’s the article:

Political hackers target 73 SA websites

Johannesburg, May 31

In the biggest hacker attack in South Africa since 1 January 2004, hackers – suspected of having
political motives – successfully defaced more than 73 local websites at the weekend.

According to Reinhardt Buys, of IT law firm Buys Inc, even the website hack.co.za, which is famous in
the Internet underground and security community, crashed under a repeated attack, Buys said.

At 12.21am on Sunday, a hacker group referred to as “FBH” hacked into the hack.co.za website. The
home page of the site was defaced with a logo and “hacker” or “leet” talk – a code language commonly used by hackers.

The site was hosted on a Linux platform and an Apache server.

According to Zone-H, a group monitoring world wide hacking activity, “FBH” is an acronym for “Federal Bureau
of Hackers” operating from Pakistan.

On Saturday from about 7.52am, another group called “DIabOlaX” hacked into and defaced 72 South African
websites – the highest daily count since the start of the year.

All the websites ran on a Windows 2000 platform.

The group removed the home page content of the websites and replaced it with a short message in hacker talk
and what seems to be the group’s email address: cr4ck3r@linuxmail.org

“The fact that an extremist Pakistani group is active in South Africa is truly worrying,” said Buys. “FBH
seems to promote a political agenda through hacking and related activities”.

He added: “Lately there has been a visible increase in politically motivated hacks.”

[Sapa]

What Mr Buys doesn’t seem to understand is that the hackers are simply targeting a vulnerable set of websites – chances are they have no idea where South Africa even is, but they have scanned the domain and are therefore able to use those sites for their message. They aren’t “active in South Africa” – they’re active on the Internet. There is no country distinction.